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Credit Programs for Part-time Students

Communication Studies

COMM 100: Communication and Social Process

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

This course addresses the many ways that communication—including language, discourse, performance, and media—reflects, creates, sustains, and transforms prevailing social and cultural practices.

Required Texts

  • Wood, Communication Theories in Action, 3rd edition (2003), ISBN 978-0534566395
  • COMM 100 Course Pack

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Shannon Wong Lerner, MS
  • Department: Communication Studies
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

COMM 120: Introduction to Interpersonal and Organizational Communication

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

This course is an introduction to communication theory, research, and practice in a variety of interpersonal and organizational contexts. This course examines the role of communication in both personal and professional relationships.

Required Textbook

  • Adler, Rosenfeld, and Proctor, Interplay: The Process of Interpersonal Communication. 12th edition, 2013. ISBN 9780199827428

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Wayne Rysavy, MA
  • Department: Communication Studies
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

COMM 140: Introduction to Media History, Theory, and Criticism

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of film and television. Students become familiar with the concepts on which humanistic understandings—as opposed to social scientific understandings—of media and culture are currently based. The course surveys the filmic, televisual, photographic, musical, and digital texts of which the contemporary international mediascape is composed. Students also study the analytic techniques available for making sense of, appreciating, and taking issue with individual media texts, groupings of media texts, and the overall “media ecology,” as understood in their proper cultural and historical contexts.

Required Textbook

  • Grossman, Wartella, and Whitney, MediaMaking: Mass Media in a Popular Culture, 2nd edition (2006)

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Required Viewing

  • Network (1976)
  • Independent Media in a Time of War (2003)
  • Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism (2004)
  • Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People (2006)
  • Brooklyn South, pilot episode, TV series vol. 1 (2003)
  • Boys Don’t Cry (1999)
  • Gattaca (1997)

These films can be rented at most video stores. Students are required to have access to a VCR or DVD player.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

COMM 142: Popular Music

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

This course explores the historical, social, political, and cultural significances of popular music as a communicative practice in the United States from 1950 to the present.

Required Materials

  • a high-speed Internet connection. You will need to access YouTube videos and a film via Netflix or other service, as well as multimedia websites and online course readings.
  • a media player such as Apple iTunes or VLC. You can download either for free if you don’t already have one.
  • a comprehensive word processing or layout program in which you can integrate images and text. Microsoft Word is sufficient. You are responsible for knowing enough about your word processing software to combine text and photographs in a single document and save as a PDF file.

Depending on what you already have, you may need to purchase music and videos for your collection over the course of the semester. In particular:

  • For Lesson 3: Michael Jackson's This Is It [videorecording]. This may be available at your local library. For those in Chapel Hill, there is a copy in the Media Resources Center at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Undergraduate library for in-library viewing. It is available to “watch instantly” at Netflix, for rent at any video store, or for sale at amazon.com and other online stores.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

Comm 170: Rhetoric and Public Issues

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

This course explores basic theoretical concepts in rhetoric and their uses in analyzing, evaluating, and producing the language, images, places, stories, and emotions of public life. Rhetoric is an ancient art, and this course will explore how classical Greek concepts and controversies about argument and style in public discourse have laid the groundwork for the way we understand political rhetoric today. Rhetorical education has long been understood as crucial to citizenship, not only because of the skills it offers in advocacy but also because of the way it enables critical analysis of political communication.

Rhetoric and Public Issues is the core course in the Rhetorical Studies concentration of Communication Studies. Attention is devoted to interpreting the persuasive function of texts and their relation to modern forms of life. Thus, in addition to its principal focus on theoretical concepts in rhetoric, it is an entry point to the culture of inquiry, argument, and contemporary public participation that constitutes rhetorical studies.

Required Materials

  • Hauser, Introduction to Rhetorical Theory, 2nd edition, 2002, ISBN 978-1577662211
  • Keith and Lundberg, The Essential Guide to Rhetoric, 2008, ISBN 978-0312472399
  • MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition, 2009, ISBN 978-1603290241

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Robert McDonald, MA
  • Department: Communication Studies
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

COMM 224: Introduction to Gender and Communication

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

Gender is both personal and social. It is personal because each of us is a gendered person whose thoughts, feelings, actions, goals, and experiences reflect and enact the gender identity that we individually adopt. Gender is also social, because the meanings of masculinity and femininity are socially constructed, reproduced, and changed. In this class we will explore both the personal and social dimensions of gender, communication, and culture, and how all three interact in our lives. We will also examine how culture sculpts gender and communication; how gender shapes communication and culture; and how communication creates, reproduces, sustains, and sometimes challenges and changes the meaning of gender and, with that, cultural structures and practices.

Required Textbook

  • Wood, Gendered Lives: Gender, Communication and Culture, 10th edition, ISBN 978-1111346485. Do not buy earlier editions.

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Bryanne Young, MA
  • Department: Communication Studies
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

COMM 318: Cultural Diversity

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-december 11)

Introduction to basic paradigms of thinking about cultural difference, encouraging students to examine how these paradigms shape how we think, act, and imagine ourselves/others as members of diverse cultures.

Required Texts

  • Lemert, Social Theory: The Multicultural, Global, and Classic Readings. 5th edition (2013), ISBN 978-0813346687

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Ali Eshraghi, MA
  • Department: Communication Studies
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll