Skip Navigation

Credit Programs for Part-time Students

Philosophy

PHIL 105: Critical Thinking*

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

*Note: This course is offered in a blended format. Although the majority of the work is completed online, some classroom meetings are required.

A course on how to identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments by other people and how to construct arguments. Topics include argument reconstruction, informal logic, fallacies, introductory formal logic, probabilistic reasoning.

Required Textbook

  • Sinnott-Armstrong and Fogelin, Understanding Arguments: An Introduction to Informal Logic, 8th edition, 2010. ISBN 9780495603955

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

Classroom Component

In addition to the online portion of the course, we will have four mandatory classroom meetings. All meetings will be held in Caldwell 213 from 7–9 pm on the following dates:

  • Sep 14
  • Oct 5
  • Nov 2
  • Nov 23

link How to Enroll

PHIL 155: Introduction to Mathematical Logic

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

Mathematical logic is the study of certain precisely specified formal languages. In this course we will study these languages and their applications. Mathematical logic has proven to be extremely useful in a number of different disciplines. First, it are helpful in the study of good and valid reasoning. We will use these formal languages to study valid and invalid forms of reasoning, and how to distinguish them. Secondly, mathematical logic is useful in the study of natural languages, and we will see some illustrative examples of this. Finally, mathematical logic is crucial for computer science and foundational issues in mathematics. Although these latter two areas quickly get into more advanced topics, we will be able to discuss some highlights of these uses of logic.

Required Textbook

  • Barwise and Etchemendy, Language Proof and Logic, 2nd edition (2011), ISBN 978-1575866321. A new copy of this textbook must be purchased. The software that is included with the textbook package comes with a password that works only for the initial purchaser.

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

PHIL 165: Bioethics

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

This course has two related objectives. 

First, this course aims to acquaint you with some of the questions and the philosophical responses to these questions that dominate contemporary thinking in the field of bioethics. You will be asked to think carefully and critically about the merits of competing responses to these questions. You will also learn to apply the theoretical tools that philosophers have developed to address these questions in analyzing particular cases. By the end of the term, you will be well-positioned to develop and argue for your own answers to these questions.

Second, but perhaps more importantly, this course aims to equip you with a certain set of skills can be usefully applied in a variety of different domains outside of philosophy. Both in your papers and in your discussion forum posts, you will practice employing abstract principles to analyze particular cases, effectively reconstructing arguments for a position or view from a piece of text, critically evaluating arguments, constructing persuasive arguments in defense of a position or view, and anticipating potential objections to a position or view.

This course has no prerequisites and is designed for students without prior exposure to philosophy. 

Required Textbook

  • Vaughn, Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases, 2nd edition (2012), ISBN 978-0199796236

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructors: Dana Falkenberg, PhD, and Wesley Sauret, PhD
  • Department: Philosophy
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll