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Credit Programs for Part-time Students

Sociology

SOCI 101: Sociological Perspectives

OFFERED 2nd Summer Session 2015 (5½ WEEKS: June 22–JULY 28)

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

SOCI 101 is an introduction to sociology as a discipline that includes study of differences and equality, social structure and institutions, culture, social change, individuals and populations, and social psychology.

Required Textbooks

  • Conley, You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist, 3rd edition, ISBN: 978-0393912999
  • Sternheimer, Everyday Sociology Reader, (2010), ISBN 978-0393934298

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Summer Instructor: Allison Mathews, MA
  • Fall Instructor: Haj Yazdiha, MA
  • Department: Sociology
  • Credit hours: 3
  • View a sample course syllabus.

link How to Enroll

SOCI 112: Social Interaction

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

This is an introductory course in microsociology. This means that we will look closely at social interaction, rather than focusing on the abstractions of social structure examined by most macrosociology courses. We will go “inside social life” to explore the ways that people create, make sense of, reproduce, and/or challenge the meaning and experience of everyday life. We will use a theoretical perspective known as symbolic interactionism, which views humans as continually engaged in the process of seeking and creating meaning through interaction with others. Our starting point will be the social construction of “the self.” However, as we move through the course, we will give increasing attention to the ways that individual action both shapes and is shaped by social contexts and institutional structures.

Ultimately, the goal of this course is to provoke thought about what we take for granted as “natural” about the social order of everyday life, in order that we may think more critically about the ways our own social interactions both reinforce and challenge the cultural practices and social institutions that constrain those very interactions.

Required Textbooks

  • Cahill, Inside Social Life, 6th edition (2010), ISBN 978-0199733262
  • Schwalbe, The Sociologically Examined Life, 4th edition (2008), ISBN 978-0-07-33801-17

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

SOCI 122: Race and Ethnic Relations

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

This course is designed to introduce you to the topic of race and ethnic relations from a sociological perspective. The first part of the course is devoted to becoming aware and conscious of the place and importance of race and ethnicity in our culture. The second part addresses brief histories of the relationships between and among different racial and ethnic groups in the United States, and, more importantly, the conditions under which those relationships originated and developed. The third part addresses institutional discrimination by discussing different aspects of how racial and ethnic relationships develop (or not) within the context of social institutions such as the family, education, the economy, the government, and even the media and entertainment.

Required Textbooks

  • Alexander, The New Jim Crow, Paperback Edition, 2012. ISBN 978-1595586438
  • Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, Reprint Edition, 2009. ISBN 978-0316013697
  • Davis, Jenkins, and Hunt, The Pact, 2003. ISBN 978-1573229890
  • Farley, Minority/Majority Relations, 6th Edition, 2005. ISBN 978-0205006571
  • Griffin, Black Like Me, 1996. ISBN 978-0451192035
  • Houston, Farewell to Manzanar, 1983. ISBN 978-0553262162
  • Santiago, When I Was Puerto Rican, 1994. ISBN 978-0679756767
  • Wise, White Like Me, 2005. ISBN 978-1932360684

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

SOCI 123: Crime and Delinquency

OFFERED 2nd Summer Session 2015 (5½ WEEKS: June 22–JULY 28)

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of crime. This course concentrates on the social facts of crime, such as the criminal justice system and the structure of economic inequality, as well as social processes, such as the development of criminal identities through interactions with criminals. We also discuss the environments in which people are embedded, with particular attention to the disruptive settings of the American urban underclass. Finally, we discuss several important sociological theories concerning crime and their implications for public policy.

Required Textbook

  • Barkan, Criminology: A Sociological Understanding, 6th edition, 2014

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

SOCI 130: Family and Society

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

This course introduces students to the sociological perspective on the American family. Both theoretical literature on family and the research process are covered, but the primary focus of the course is on encouraging critical thinking skills in studying and reading about family. Contemporary novels and articles assist students in learning to interweave the emotional experience of family (their own) with the scientific analysis of family (a social institution).

Required Textbooks

  • Cherlin, Public and Private Families: An Introduction, 6th edition, ISBN 978-0073404356
  • Delinsky, Family Tree
  • Coontz, The Way We Really Are
  • Edelman, The Measure of Our Success
  • Edgerton, Raney
  • Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed
  • Munsch, The Paper Bag Princess
  • Tannen, You Just Don't Understand

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

SOCI 131: Social Relations in the Workplace

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

Meaning and content of work in modern industrial society. Preparation for work; autonomy and control; inequality; consequences for health, safety, and family life.

Required Textbooks

  • Hodson, Dignity at Work, 2001, ISBN 978-0521778121
  • Harper and Lawson, The Cultural Study of Work, 2003, ISBN 978-0742519183

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

  • Instructor: Shane Elliott, MA
  • Department: Sociology
  • Credit hours: 3
  • A sample course syllabus is not yet available.

link How to Enroll

SOCI 410: Formal Organizations and Bureaucracy

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

In every moment of every day, organizations and bureaucracies affect life in countless subtle and obvious ways. In our post-industrial Western society, formal organizations order our lives and fulfill our needs. Despite their immense influence, most understandings of organizations are vague, shallow, and unspecific.

This course aims to provide you with a thorough sociological understanding of organizations. We will look at where organizations come from, how they change, and how they die. We will examine the ways organizations are structured, the ways they act, and the relationships between individuals in organizations, between individuals and organizations, and between organizations.

A critical and rigorous understanding of organizations and organizational behavior underpins our understanding of the world around us. This course will give you the tools to apprehend organizational forms and processes at work in your life and in your world.

Required Textbooks

  • Aldrich and Ruef, Organizations Evolving, 2nd edition (2006), ISBN: 978-1412910477
  • Scott and Davis, Organizations and Organizing: Rational, Natural, and Open Systems Perspectives (2006), ISBN: 978-0131958937

You may purchase the textbooks at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll

SOCI 415: Economy and Society

Offered Fall semester 2015 (August 18-December 11)

SOCI 415 emphasizes the importance of sociological perspectives in understanding and explaining economic activities such as shopping at global retailers, hiring an employee, or obtaining a bank loan to start a business. The course presents a diverse set of perspectives on economic sociology while covering some of the most significant and promising areas of research in the field. It focuses on six main perspectives: institutions and institutionalism, social networks and social capital, cognition and decision-making processes, power, inequality based on race and gender, and consumption patterns, social class, and social groups.

Required Textbook

  • Dobbin, The New Economic Sociology: A Reader (2004)

You may purchase the textbook at Friday Center Books & Gifts in person, online, or by mailing or faxing in the book order form. Refer to the online ordering site for current book prices. Please see Textbooks for textbook purchase dates.

Course Details

link How to Enroll